Posts tagged "coercive control"

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Understanding disabled women's experiences of domestic abuse

Dr Ravi K. Thiara is a principal research fellow at the Centre for the Study of Safety and Wellbeing, University of Warwick. In this blog she discusses how the concept of intersectionality can help us to understand the ways in which disabled women experience domestic abuse, and how services can help to remove barriers to access. 

Recognising and supporting disabled victims of domestic abuse

Ruth Bashall is the Director of Stay Safe East, an organization run by disabled people which supports disabled survivors of domestic and sexual violence, hate crime and other abuse, and works for change in policy and strategies at London and national level. For more information about our work, including our training programme, please contact director@staysafe-east.org.uk

Disability and domestic violence

Dr Justin Varney is the National Lead for Adult Health and Wellbeing at Public Health England. In this blog, he talks about the ways that people living with impairments are affected by domestic abuse, and the ways in which barriers to accessibility further disable individuals seeking help.

For an audio version of this blog, scroll down to the bottom of the page.

About 1 in 5 of the population live with an impairment which leads to them being disabled in their interactions with the world around them.

10 Key Practice Points for Supporting Clients with Learning Disabilities

Collette Eaton-Harris is a Knowledge Hub Advisor for SafeLives. In this blog she talks to specialist practitioners about how domestic abuse workers can make their services more accessible to people with learning disabilities. She shares 10 tips that focus on making sure the client's needs are being met, and that all applicable risks are being considered.

Making the Marac process work for disabled people

For an audio version of this blog, please scroll to the bottom of this page or click through to our Soundcloud page.

Jennifer Daw is a Research Analyst for SafeLives. In this blog she looks at what current Marac data tells us about how many disabled people are accessing support services. She writes about 'hidden impairments' and SafeLives' recommendations for the inclusion of disabled people at Marac. 

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